Mike Cosper's Bookshelf

Books . Movies . Music . More
Mike Cosper's Bookshelf
Mike Cosper's Bookshelf
Books . Movies . Music . More

Mike Cosper

Author, Director of the Harbor Institute for Faith and Culture

My Current Favorites

Five books, movies, or songs influencing me now
The Soul of Shame: Retelling the Stories We Believe About Ourselves
The Soul of Shame: Retelling the Stories We Believe About Ourselves
by Curt Thompson
WHY I LIKE IT
Reading now. Powerful stuff.
Changing the Subject: Art and Attention in the Internet Age
Changing the Subject: Art and Attention in the Internet Age
by Sven Birkerts
WHY I LIKE IT
Reading right now – an interesting exploration of the effects of digital culture.

My Essentials

My all-time favorite books, movies and music
Infinite Jest
Infinite Jest
by David Foster Wallace
WHY I LIKE IT
I know of no better exploration of addiction, longing for connection, and the trouble with entertainment culture than Infinite Jest. Challenging to read at times, laugh-out-loud funny, and every page is full of exquisite sentences.
A Secular Age
A Secular Age
by Charles Taylor
WHY I LIKE IT
As Miroslav Volf once said, "Charles needed an editor." This book is LOOOONG. But it's worth wading through because Taylor's insights into Christian experience and history since the enlightenment are profound.
Unceasing Worship: Biblical Perspectives on Worship and the Arts
Unceasing Worship: Biblical Perspectives on Worship and the Arts
by Dr. Harold M. Best
WHY I LIKE IT
There are few books as thorough, wide-ranging, and well-written as this one. It's a book about worship, but more than that, it's a book about the gospel, the call of the artist, and the life of the church.
Desiring the Kingdom: Worship, Worldview, and Cultural Formation (Cultural Liturgies)
Desiring the Kingdom: Worship, Worldview, and Cultural Formation (Cultural Liturgies)
by James K.A. Smith
WHY I LIKE IT
This is a book that transforms the way you see culture – from political rallies to blockbuster movies, to a trip to the mall. Smith exposes the religious and liturgical nature of all of life, and invites us to reflect on the way our practices form our identity.
The Gift: Creativity and the Artist in the Modern World
The Gift: Creativity and the Artist in the Modern World
by Lewis Hyde
WHY I LIKE IT
Hyde likens creativity to gifts, and frames the way artists should approach their work and think about their vocations, contrasting "gifts" with "commodities." It's an inspiring re-framing of the work of the artist, and a book that re-shapes the way artists will see the world.
Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil (Penguin Classics)
Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil (Penguin Classics)
by Hannah Arendt
WHY I LIKE IT
Hannah Arendt expected Eichmann to reveal himself to be a Nazi monster. Instead, he revealed a bureaucratic buffoon. How does radical evil infect a bureaucracy? How do normal people participate in genocide? How does evil become the "norm" overnight in a culture? These are the questions at the hear of this book, which will challenge you to scrutinize the language of politics, war, and ideology.
Overcoming Sin and Temptation [Paperback] [2006] (Author) John Owen, Kelly M. Kapic, Justin Taylor, John Piper
Overcoming Sin and Temptation [Paperback] [2006] (Author) John Owen, Kelly M. Kapic, Justin Taylor, John Piper
 
WHY I LIKE IT
It doesn't get much better than this one.

My Bookshelf Archive

my archived books, movies, music, and more
Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights: A Novel
Two Years Eight Months and Twenty-Eight Nights: A Novel
by Salman Rushdie
WHY I LIKE IT
In many ways, this book is one big metaphor. The only magic left in Rushdie's worldview is art, and in a way, I think the Jinn in this book are proxies for artists, and proxies for the artist's journey. A great read.
Against the Tide: Love in a Time of Petty Dreams and Persisting Enmities
Against the Tide: Love in a Time of Petty Dreams and Persisting Enmities
by Miroslav Volf
WHY I LIKE IT
This is a collection of short essays Volf wrote for a popular publication. In each essay, we see Volf applying his vision of love, reconciliation, and good and evil to real-life circumstances.